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“NGC@WAG: Ron Mueck” Looks at Hyperrealist Sculptor Ron Mueck’s Process

The Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG) in Canada is currently exhibiting some of hyperrealist sculptor Ron Mueck's most poignant works to date. The Australia born artist, recently featured in HF Vol. 30, is well known for his larger-than-life fiberglass portrait sculptures of life's key stages. This new exhibition, named "NGC@WAG: Ron Mueck" for its cooperation with the National Gallery of Canada, offers attendees a rare look at the process behind Mueck's work, including his original maquettes and studies.

The Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG) in Canada is currently exhibiting some of hyperrealist sculptor Ron Mueck’s most poignant works to date. The Australia born artist, recently featured in HF Vol. 30, is well known for his larger-than-life fiberglass portrait sculptures of life’s key stages. This new exhibition, named “NGC@WAG: Ron Mueck” for its cooperation with the National Gallery of Canada, offers attendees a rare look at the process behind Mueck’s work, including his original maquettes and studies. Among the works on view are his 2000 sculpture “Untitled (Old Woman in Bed)” and 2006 sculpture “A Girl,” inspired by his own grandmother and infant daughter respectively. Despite their towering size, there is a vulnerability to his works that makes them feel strangely familiar. Each recreates scenes from the artist’s personal life, utilizing scale for added emotional impact. For example, as we loom over his ailing grandmother in “Untitled (Old Woman in Bed)” Mueck encourages us to look inwards and consider our smallness in the grand scheme of life. Her figure is dwarfed by “A Girl,” measuring more than 16 feet long, exaggerating the feeling of overwhelming responsibility that comes with having a child. “NGC@WAG: Ron Mueck”, in partnership with the National Gallery of Canada, and is now on display at WAG through October 4th.

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