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Mark Warren Jacques Paints Abstract Seascapes in “Looking at You – Looking at Me”

Photos by Curtis Cole. Portland based artist Mark Warren Jacques (previously featured here) makes dreamy, futuristic paintings using various elements of form, color and shape. His upcoming exhibition "Looking at You - Looking at Me", opening June 4th at Flatcolor gallery, exercises these motifs in a series of new seascapes. Warren sees the universe in a unique way. He aims to capture a newfound sense of infinity in these vast, unending places rendered from personal memories. Get a look inside the artist’s studio as he prepares for his new exhibit after the jump.

Portland based artist Mark Warren Jacques (previously featured here) makes dreamy, futuristic paintings using various elements of form, color and shape. His upcoming exhibition “Looking at You – Looking at Me”, opening June 4th at Flatcolor gallery, exercises these motifs in a series of new seascapes. Warren sees the universe in a unique way. He aims to capture a newfound sense of infinity in these vast, unending places rendered from personal memories. While abstract, under layers of those geometric patterns lies his narrative, and his choice of colors help to instigate an emotional reaction. He shares, “Sometimes I look into the night sky, or out across the water at sunset and I can not help but feel as though “it” is looking right back at me, reciprocating the feelings that I know as “myself”. Call this “it” God, or call “it” Nature, or call “it” whatever you like, but that feeling, that reciprocation, seems to be our most rewarding connection to life.” Get a look inside the artist’s studio as he prepares for his new exhibit, courtesy of the gallery.

Photos by Curtis Cole.

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