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Kwang-Ho Lee’s Hyperrealist Paintings of Quirky Cacti

One of South Korea's eminent realist painters, Kwang-Ho Lee's "Touch" series brings out the tactile qualities of exotic cacti. The desert plants blossom in oblong shapes in Lee's large-scale works, inviting viewers to examine their thorns, fluff, and smooth skin. Some coiled and others upright and phallic-looking, each plant takes on its own personality. Lee's paintings are easy to mistake for photographs at a first glance, but his stylized compositions take his work beyond straightforward documentation.

One of South Korea’s eminent realist painters, Kwang-Ho Lee’s “Touch” series brings out the tactile qualities of exotic cacti. The desert plants blossom in oblong shapes in Lee’s large-scale works, inviting viewers to examine their thorns, fluff, and smooth skin. Some coiled and others upright and phallic-looking, each plant takes on its own personality. Lee’s paintings are easy to mistake for photographs at a first glance, but his stylized compositions take his work beyond straightforward documentation.

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