Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Preview: “Samurai!” Group Exhibition at the Worcester Art Museum

The word "samurai" immediately brings to mind the famed Japanese warrior skilled in the art of war. Samurai were artists as well, and applied their strategy to studies like calligraphy, ink painting, and architecture. Perhaps more importantly, they were patrons of the arts. Their exploits continue to pique the interest of Contemporary artists today. Some of these artists will exhibit in Worcester Art Museum's upcoming exhibition "Samurai!", curated by Eric Nakamura, such as Andrew Hem, Audrey Kawasaki, Mari Inukai, James Jean, kozyndan, Mu Pan, Masakatsu Sashie, Rob Sato, and Kent Williams. They each present their interpretations of samurai as cultural icons of history and our fantasies.


Kent Williams

The word “samurai” immediately brings to mind the famed Japanese warrior skilled in the art of war. Samurai were artists as well, and applied their strategy to studies like calligraphy, ink painting, and architecture. Perhaps more importantly, they were patrons of the arts. Their exploits continue to pique the interest of Contemporary artists today. Some of these artists will exhibit in Worcester Art Museum’s upcoming exhibition “Samurai!”, curated by Eric Nakamura, such as Andrew Hem, Audrey Kawasaki, Mari Inukai, James Jean, kozyndan, Mu Pan, Masakatsu Sashie, Rob Sato, and Kent Williams. They each present their interpretations of samurai as cultural icons of history and our fantasies. These include surreal and comical re-imagined battles of samurai, as in Mu Pan’s painting of rōnin (a samurai with no lord or master) fighting Godzilla. There were also female samurai or onna-bugeisha, represented in Kent Williams’ portrait of Mari Inukai and her daughter posed for combat. One of the most fantastic images comes from Sashie Masakatsu, who dresses one of his signature orbs with traditional samurai motifs. All of these draw upon the themes and lasting impression of samurai, in connection to the museum’s collection of original artifacts.

The “Samurai!” group exhibition opens at the Worcester Art Museum on April 18th.


Sashie Masakatsu


Rob Sato


Shawn Cheng


Moira Hahn


Mu Pan


Mu Pan (detail)


James Jean

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
This month, Rob Sato returns to Giant Robot with a new body of work under the title "Arco Iris." These watercolor works tackle the differing significance of rainbows through several lenses. (Sato’s work is part of the upcoming Hi-Fructose Collected 4 box set, here.) The gallery and company says that this new show “marks another radical shift in style for the artist.”
San Jose based comic book artist and "professional hater" Jonathan Wayshak draws energetic illustrations which were featured in Hi-Fructose Collected II. At his Facebook page, he writes "I draw pictures with a lot of lines and huge nipples", but that's a modest description of his rough and enthralling drawing style. Wayshak works with a variety of materials; brush ink, gouache, acrylic, pencil, watercolors, pens, on whatever else is handy - paper scraps and leftover cut down illustration boards or watercolor paper. Take a look inside Wayshak's sketchbook after the jump.
Symmetry and beauty are often claimed to be linked, however over the years, artists have discovered that the less predictable beauty in asymmetry results in a more interesting piece of art. American artist James McNeill Whistler's "The Artist's Mother" is often used as a prime example of how imbalance can improve a composition, while Andy Warhol's famous "Marilyn Diptych", a work consisting of two panels, is argued by art critics as one of the best pieces he ever created. Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles noticed the influence of these visual concepts and asked artists to combine them, resulting in the "Asymmetrical Diptych Group Show".
Two solo shows kick off this weekend at Thinkspace Gallery in Culver City, Calif.: Audrey Kawasaki's “Interlude” and Stella Im Hultberg's “Hollow Resonance.” Both shows kick off on Saturday (Nov. 12) and run through Dec. 3.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List