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Preview: Bicicleta Sem Freio’s “Fera” at RexRomae Gallery

Brazilian artists Biciclea Sem Freio have a solo show titled "Fera" coming up on March 5 at London's RexRomae Gallery, curated by JustKids. The duo met at the university of Federal University of Goiás while studying visual art. They got their start designing rock posters and quickly moved on to creating their personal, collaborative artwork and street art. Nowadays, their colorful, graphic murals have taken them all over the world. Take a look at some of the pieces that will be included in "Fera" as well as some of their recent walls below.


London. Photo by Monoprixx.

Brazilian artists Biciclea Sem Freio have a solo show titled “Fera” coming up on March 5 at London’s RexRomae Gallery, curated by JustKids. The duo met at the university of Federal University of Goiás while studying visual art. They got their start designing rock posters and quickly moved on to creating their personal, collaborative artwork and street art. Nowadays, their colorful, graphic murals have taken them all over the world. Take a look at some of the pieces that will be included in “Fera” as well as some of their recent walls below.


Bicicleta Sem Freio. Photo by Bruno Soares.


Los Angeles. Photo by Koury Angelo.


Lisbon.


Puerto Rico.


Miami.


Gaeta, Italy. Photo by Blind Eye Factory.

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