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Jeremie Dru’s Dreamy Double-Exposure Photographs

French photographer Jeremie Dru sees hidden patterns in his everyday surroundings. The artist captures odd and intriguing moments in architecture and nature with his medium-format camera, often using double-exposure and other analog methods to create surreal effects. Dru is particularly fascinated with reflections. He frequently alters images to create symmetry: a mountain doubled and inverted to create a floating diamond shape, a watery reflection of a bridge that extends from a river into the sky. Dru's unconventional take on these scenes inspires us to examine our daily commute with a fresh perspective.

French photographer Jeremie Dru sees hidden patterns in his everyday surroundings. The artist captures odd and intriguing moments in architecture and nature with his medium-format camera, often using double-exposure and other analog methods to create surreal effects. Dru is particularly fascinated with reflections. He frequently alters images to create symmetry: a mountain doubled and inverted to create a floating diamond shape, a watery reflection of a bridge that extends from a river into the sky. Dru’s unconventional take on these scenes inspires us to examine our daily commute with a fresh perspective.

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