Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Amandine Urruty’s Whimsical Drawings of Bizarre Characters

French artist Amandine Urruty's busy graphite drawings overflow with humorous characters. Dog-faced people, sausages painting at easels, floating teeth, and tiny bed sheet ghosts run amuck in her whimsical worlds. One can spend a long time gazing at her drawings and examining each oddball creature. Though the artist's typical work is monochromatic and small-scale, she recently tried her hand at a large, colorful mural in Zaragoza, Spain. Take a look at some of her recent work below.

French artist Amandine Urruty’s busy graphite drawings overflow with humorous characters. Dog-faced people, sausages painting at easels, floating teeth, and tiny bed sheet ghosts run amuck in her whimsical worlds. One can spend a long time gazing at her drawings and examining each oddball creature. Though the artist’s typical work is monochromatic and small-scale, she recently tried her hand at a large, colorful mural in Zaragoza, Spain. Take a look at some of her recent work below.


Zaragoza, Spain

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
In Heather Benjamin's recent work, her "lone cowgirl" character moves through a spectrum of emotions, attitudes, and phases that reflect the complexity of womanhood. She offered several of these new drawings in a show at Tokyo’s gallery commune under the banner "Burden of Blossom."
Whether rendered in graphite or oils, the shadowed subjects of Allen Williams thrill in both what's being shown and what’s being obscured. In a new show at Copro Gallery, titled "Covenant," a massive amount of work from Williams is displayed. This is the artist's first solo show with the gallery.
Barnaby Whitfield's portraits are rendered with acidic shades of chalk pastel as if illuminated by a strange, disorienting light source. His characters' pallid skin glows with an almost fluorescent shade of white and the wrinkles, bruises, and redness on their faces is especially accentuated. Their vulnerability manifests in the form of physical scars.
In Joel Daniel Phillips' art, featured here, the characters living in his neighborhood are brought to the center stage and become the hero of their own story. The San Francisco based artist's graphite and charcoal drawings feature people on the streets who generally go unnoticed by the public, or are virtually ignored, only to become celebrated in his monumental works. "A true portrait is far more than a rendering of physical form," he says, focusing instead on portraying the vulnerable nature that makes us human.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List