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Premiere: Tim Burton’s Feature Film, “Big Eyes,” at the Ace Hotel

Hi-Fructose attended last night's premiere of Tim Burton's biopic, "Big Eyes" at the theatre at Ace hotel in Downtown Los Angeles. The premiere was also attended by leading actress Amy Adams, notable fans and gallerists including Mark Ryden, Marion Peck, Andrew and Shawn Hosner of Thinkspace Gallery, Greg Escalante of Copro Gallery, and Margaret Keane's own San Francisco based Keane Eyes Gallery, to name a few. "Big Eyes" chronicles the journey of Margaret Keane's popular big-eyed waifs, from humble beginnings to her abusive relationship with Walter Keane, who locked her in a studio and took credit for her art for years. Photos from the premiere after the jump!

Hi-Fructose attended last night’s premiere of Tim Burton’s biopic, “Big Eyes” at the theatre at Ace hotel in Downtown Los Angeles. The premiere was also attended by leading actress Amy Adams, notable fans and gallerists including Mark Ryden, Marion Peck, Andrew and Shawn Hosner of Thinkspace Gallery, Greg Escalante of Copro Gallery, and Margaret Keane’s own San Francisco based Keane Eyes Gallery, to name a few. “Big Eyes” chronicles the journey of Margaret Keane’s popular big-eyed waifs, from humble beginnings to her abusive relationship with Walter Keane, who locked her in a studio and took credit for her art for years.


Artist Margaret Keane speaks during a Q&A, following the screening.

Keane’s real life story is stranger and even more incredible than fiction, with a happy ending. Margaret eventually sued her ex-husband in federal court for slander and was awarded $4 million in damages. At a Q&A following the screening, Margaret Keane spoke on the film’s message of female empowerment and what she would like audiences to take away from it: “Stand up for your rights and be courageous, and read your bible- that will give you strength.” Her works while living in her husband’s shadow tended to depict sad children in a dark setting, but today, they cry tears of joy. You can read more about Margaret Keane in our next print issue, hitting store shelves in January 2015.

“Big Eyes” directed by Tim Burton opens in theaters on Christmas Day 2014.


Margaret Keane with HF blogger Caro.


Margaret Keane with Thinkspace Gallery’s Andrew and Shawn Hosner.

Preorder Hi-Fructose Vol 34, featuring Margaret Keane:

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