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Justin Lovato’s Intricate, Op Art-Inspired Paintings

In Justin Lovato's new paintings, patterns are layered on top of one another to create dualistic compositions. Kaleidoscopic, sunset-hued arrangements of shapes in turn create new images with their negative space, an effect the artist says represents a conduit between two worlds. "I have always been interested in dreams, subconscious and ecstatic states, and the experience of alternate or parallel universes or dimensions," wrote Lovato in an email to Hi-Fructose. "With this series especially I have been trying to relay the idea of parallel but different planes transposed on top of one another."

In Justin Lovato’s new paintings, patterns are layered on top of one another to create dualistic compositions. Kaleidoscopic, sunset-hued arrangements of shapes in turn create new images with their negative space, an effect the artist says represents a conduit between two worlds. “I have always been interested in dreams, subconscious and ecstatic states, and the experience of alternate or parallel universes or dimensions,” wrote Lovato in an email to Hi-Fructose. “With this series especially I have been trying to relay the idea of parallel but different planes transposed on top of one another.”

Lovato recently closed his solo show “Prima Materia” at Space Gallery in Denver, where he showed alongside his mentors, Mars-1, Damon Soule, and Oliver Vernon. Take a look at some of his latest work below.

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