Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Dario Maglionico’s Paintings Convey a Haunting Presence

Italian painter Dario Maglionico creates voyeuristic paintings that put his viewers in the position of a fly on the wall. Set in cozy, domestic interiors, his works feature characters that aren't completely there. Maglionico paints ghostly outlines of incomplete bodies — outfits and hairdos that float without their human wearers, smeared blobs of color where facial expression would be. His characters evoke specters of people who once inhabited these spaces. Alternatively, they could refer to the subjective nature of memory — remembering the past as how we would like it to be, not as it was.

Italian painter Dario Maglionico creates voyeuristic paintings that put his viewers in the position of a fly on the wall. Set in cozy, domestic interiors, his works feature characters that aren’t completely there. Maglionico paints ghostly outlines of incomplete bodies — outfits and hairdos that float without their human wearers, smeared blobs of color where facial expression would be. His characters evoke specters of people who once inhabited these spaces. Alternatively, they could refer to the subjective nature of memory — remembering the past as how we would like it to be, not as it was.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles

Shozy's illusionary murals use subtle techniques that enhance the life of a work. For instance, with the pieces above, packing bikes into a “hole” in the structure, uses reflective chrome paint that will change hues with the sky of the day.

The latest work from artist Greg "Craola" Simkins explores the daydreams of youth, offering alternative universes and fantastical creatures. His new show with KP Projects, “The Escape Artist,” collects those new paintings and drawings. Simkins was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here, and he created the cover and was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 41.
Henry Gunderson's new solo show at Derek Eller Gallery, titled "It's a Great Time to be Alive," explores how an “image-saturated culture” is deeply embedding itself into our psyches. Running through Feb. 2 at the New York City space, the show features a self-portrait of the painter, “It’s Hard to See from Where I’m Standing," seen below.
The whimsical, surreal oil paintings of Thomas Ascott use the Smoky Mountains in Tennessee as a backdrop, where the artist himself was raised. This creates a highly personal aspect to these works, part of a new show at Arch Enemy Arts titled “The Astral Woods.”

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List