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Iridescent Glass Sculptures and Installations by Chris Wood

English artist Chris Wood creates glass wall-panels that showcase maze-like structures that give the illusion of depth and brilliance through the glass’ interaction with natural and artificial light sources. The artist’s usage of small, reflective, dichroic (meaning "two color") pieces of glass lets her easily create complex patterns of light and shade; the colors and textures that derive from these structures change in accordance to the position of the viewer and the angle of the light source, making her work an ever-changing, almost magical and intriguing phenomenon.

English artist Chris Wood creates glass wall-panels that showcase maze-like structures that give the illusion of depth and brilliance through the glass’ interaction with natural and artificial light sources. The artist’s usage of small, reflective, dichroic (meaning “two color”) pieces of glass lets her easily create complex patterns of light and shade; the colors and textures that derive from these structures change in accordance to the position of the viewer and the angle of the light source, making her work an ever-changing, almost magical and intriguing phenomenon.

Invented in the 1950s by NASA, dichroic glass’ special optical coating lets it reflect certain wavelengths of light while letting others pass through it, making it easier for the artist to actually manipulate these varying optical projections towards each wall-mounted structure. Besides working on wall panels, she also creates installations and outdoor works. One of her most recent installations, Corona, features a circular arrangement made from dichroic glass rectangles that project and reflect from the surface of the water. Depending on perspective, the reflection of the glass in the water visually doubles the height of the glass piece and projects a myriad of vibrant colors.

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