Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Preview: Reka and Two One at StolenSpace Gallery

Both based in Berlin by way of Australia, Two One and Reka (see our recent studio visit here) are exhibiting together at StolenSpace Gallery in London in two concurrent solo shows: Reka's "Trip the Light" and Two One's "The Hunted Hunter's Head." Inspired by the graceful movements of dancers from a young age, Reka (whose mother was a ballerina) presents a series of paintings that pay homage to the fluid, abstract shapes the body can make. His Cubist-inspired paintings might have one imagining a toe-tapping soundtrack of jazz or even the swell of a symphony, but Reka tempers these allusions to older, more traditional art forms with gritty paint textures that evoke his graffiti roots.

Both based in Berlin by way of Australia, Two One and Reka (see our recent studio visit here) are exhibiting together at StolenSpace Gallery in London in two concurrent solo shows: Reka’s “Trip the Light” and Two One’s “The Hunted Hunter’s Head.” Inspired by the graceful movements of dancers from a young age, Reka (whose mother was a ballerina) presents a series of paintings that pay homage to the fluid, abstract shapes the body can make. His Cubist-inspired paintings might have one imagining a toe-tapping soundtrack of jazz or even the swell of a symphony, but Reka tempers these allusions to older, more traditional art forms with gritty paint textures that evoke his graffiti roots.

Like Reka, Two One got his start in Melbourne’s graffiti scene after immigrating there from Japan in his teens. He focuses on human-animal hybrids in his work that he refers to as “psychological portraits.” While his previous work has focused on humans’ interactions with the natural world, his new paintings are rendered with a textured scrawl that gives them a raw edge. Interested in patterns evocative of various folk art forms, Two One lays the evidence of human touch, with all its imperfections, bare for all to see.

Reka’s “Trip the Light” and Two One’s “The Hunted Hunter’s Head” open at StolenSpace Gallery in London on September 12.

Reka in his studio


Two One with his recent mural in Berlin.

 


Twoone in his studio

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Tanner MacLeod’s acrylic paintings create unexpected characters out of geometric forms, taking influence from primitive computer art. (The artist’s “A Noble Mustachian,” in particular, appears taken from Dire Straits’ “Money for Nothing” video.) Elsewhere, the polygonal arrangements create abstract works.
Matthew Ivan Cherry, a Boston-based painter, creates oil portraits that ooze with vulnerability and a erratic, yet cohesive style. He uses his subjects, often met on the streets or on social media, to explore issues of individuality, gender identity, and the inherent beauty of the human form. Certain projects, like "somewhereX,” are tethered to Cherry’s upbringing as a Mormon. The project features enormous portraits of LGBTQ mormons (whether active or inactive), including Cherry himself.
Vladimir Kraynyk's work takes inspiration from art history and cutting-edge technology alike. His oil paintings of voluminous abstract forms reference the decorative arts of the Baroque period as well as contemporary 3D-rendered images. These disparate aesthetics combine to form geometric shapes that appear to be in constant motion. Forms come together and break apart like a colorful Big Bang repeating over and over again. Kraynyk has a background in graffiti, which comes through in the way his abstract shapes evoke calligraphy. Take a look at his work below.
Nick Runge, a Los Angeles-based artist, crafts dreamlike and moody paintings of mysterious figures and scenes. Though these works carry flashes of realism, these works carry abstractions that either push backdrops into otherworldly territory or interfere with the subject itself.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List