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Rocio Montoya’s Ethereal Double-Exposure Photography

Though she is known for her work in fashion photography, the fine art photography of the Madrid-based Rocio Montoya offers a interesting new look at her skills in portraiture. Montoya's subjects, generally young women, are captured in moments that range from intense euphoric emotion to still, deadpan gazes. In some images, the faces of the subjects are obscured, adding a sense of aloofness and mystery. Her works are predominately in black and white, but Montoya uses a range of effects such as double exposure to make the images more vivid. Through her techniques, Montoya brings a new vision into the images she captures.

Though she is known for her work in fashion photography, the fine art photography of the Madrid-based Rocio Montoya offers a interesting new look at her skills in portraiture. Montoya’s subjects, generally young women, are captured in moments that range from intense euphoric emotion to still, deadpan gazes. In some images, the faces of the subjects are obscured, adding a sense of aloofness and mystery. Her works are predominately in black and white, but Montoya uses a range of effects such as double exposure to make the images more vivid. Through her techniques, Montoya brings a new vision into the images she captures.

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