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David Delruelle’s Playful Collages

Belgian artist David Delruelle creates frenetic collages that defy physical laws. It would be misguided to look for some sort of lucid commentary within his work. Instead of using explicit symbolism, the artist relishes shock-factor juxtapositions and plays with his viewers' gut reactions and desires. A distinct thread throughout his body of work is a visceral depiction of human anatomy. Delruelle superimposes realistic illustrations of hearts, brains and intestines over human faces, creating strange mutants with scrambled parts. Other collages indulge the fantasy of escaping to a magical land. Delruelle juxtaposes close-up images of creatures and sweeping vistas to make human beings appear minuscule in the context of nature.

Belgian artist David Delruelle creates frenetic collages that defy physical laws. It would be misguided to look for some sort of lucid commentary within his work. Instead of using explicit symbolism, the artist relishes shock-factor juxtapositions and plays with his viewers’ gut reactions and desires. A distinct thread throughout his body of work is a visceral depiction of human anatomy. Delruelle superimposes realistic illustrations of hearts, brains and intestines over human faces, creating strange mutants with scrambled parts. Other collages indulge the fantasy of escaping to a magical land. Delruelle juxtaposes close-up images of creatures and sweeping vistas to make human beings appear minuscule in the context of nature.

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