Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Yong Ho Ji’s Haunting Mutant Sculptures Made From Recycled Tires

Korean artist Yong Ho Ji creates animal/human hybrids made out of recycled tires. Ji calls his variations "mutants" in order to refer to both their hybrid forms and their recycled medium. “My concept is mutation,” Ji says, “the end product is technically from nature; it is made from the white sap of latex trees but here it has changed. The color is black and the look is scary."

Korean artist Yong Ho Ji creates animal/human hybrids made out of recycled tires. Ji calls his variations “mutants” in order to refer to both their hybrid forms and their recycled medium. “My concept is mutation,” Ji says, “the end product is technically from nature; it is made from the white sap of latex trees but here it has changed. The color is black and the look is scary.”

Ji looks to create a variation of carnivorous, herbivorous and omnivorous animals, as well as arthropods, fish and hybrids of such animals. By pasting and reshaping strips of used tires onto molds and frames he makes himself, Ji mimics the way real skin and muscles move and hang on to animal’s skeletons. The process is labor intensive. However, his realistic, detailed approach makes his work that much more surreal.

Ji’s choice of materials and concepts alike poses interesting questions regarding mass production, technology and genetic engineering. While the constant production of new tires can be seen as a symbol of consumerism, Ji’s hybrids showcase the incessant human desire to “play God” and challenge nature’s will through advanced technologies.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
While many of us can’t keep a decent castle together, Carl Jara, a Cleveland-based artist, creates surreal figures and scenes that defy the medium of sand sculpture. Jara has nabbed dozens of awards and world championships, traveled the world, and even been featured on the Travel Channel for his efforts. And while many take to sea animals, pirate imagery, and other ocean fare for inspiration, Jara uses sand to inject life into the unexpected.
The concept of the Wunderkammer, aka The Cabinet Of Curiosities has been an artistic inspiration for some time, however a new show opening in November by Ryan Matthew Cohn and Jean Labourdette takes it up a notch with an exceptional show of sculptures and paintings based thematically on the subject. Click to read the new Hi-Fructose exclusive interview.
Through the manipulation of 17 people, La Machine unleashed a dragon on Calais, France, with its latest, towering creation and performance. "Le Dragon de Calais" was unveiled earlier this month by the French group of artists, which was last featured on HiFructose.com here. Previously, they crafted a 60-foot mechanical spider, 50-foot-tall Minotaur, and other creatures ripped from myth for their performances.
With “Le Souffle de Changement," Pierre Matter offers a surreal, contemplative set of sculptures crafted from bronze and recycled objects. The exhibition currently inhabits one of the AFA Gallery-curated spaces at Château Belcastel in France. In the process of creating these works, Matter uses “welders, plasma cutters, laser cutters and grinders to shape and sculpt,” AFA says. The exhibition runs through October.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List