Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Lori Nix Builds and Photographs Miniature Disaster Scenes

Lori Nix’s first solo exhibition in Germany recently closed. Exhibited at Galerie Klüser in Munich, "The City" featured photographs of spaces left abandoned and in chaos. Though the photographs look convincingly like documentation of real spaces, they are snapshots of miniature, doll house-like dioramas the artist builds in her studio. The series, in which each staged photograph represents a snapshot of a destitute city, appears to have been captured long after an unnamed apocalyptic moment.

Lori Nix’s first solo exhibition in Germany recently closed. Exhibited at Galerie Klüser in Munich, “The City” featured photographs of spaces left abandoned and in chaos. Though the photographs look convincingly like documentation of real spaces, they are snapshots of miniature, doll house-like dioramas the artist builds in her studio. The series, in which each staged photograph represents a snapshot of a destitute city, appears to have been captured long after an unnamed apocalyptic moment.

In Map Room, old world globes are scattered in a Baroque room lined with maps and topped with a vaulted marble ceiling. The lighting makes it appear as if a thick layer of dust has settled over the precious objects. The observer feels a sense of loss, struggling to decipher the hanging maps and to define the city’s geographic location.

In contrast to the destroyed elegance of Map Room, Chinese Take-Out shows the narrow hall of a fast-food restaurant in shambles. Like Map Room, the wall decorations do not orient the viewer, but instead offer a sense of being anywhere and everywhere. “The City” could very well be any city in the world, and perhaps in this way, the series functions as a universal and prophetic warning. A glimmer of hope exists however, in Subway. In this work, the observer is placed inside a sand-filled subway car. Through parted doors, one sees skyscrapers in the distance. This image gives the observer an impression of being a lone survivor, while also suggesting life may still exist elsewhere.

Those who are curious about how Nix stages these apocalyptic scenes should visit her blog, My 8×10 Life, where she demystifies much of her process.


Lori Nix in her studio working on a diorama.


Nix’s cat invades the set.


Studio view of one of the dioramas.

Meta
Topics
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Illustrator-turned-fine artist Janice Sung’s figures seem at home amidst natural settings, whether in a lily pad pond or a garden, floating like a near-translucent milk specters. Her recent gallery showing at Gallery Nucleus in Los Angeles, the first using physical media by the artist. We asked the artist a few questions about her new body of work and about transitioning from digital to physical media. Click the above already and read the hifructose.com exclusive interview.
Hi-Fructose writer Zara Kand visits Coleccion SOLO in Spain for their latest Handle With Care exhibition. Click above to see the full report.
As a tribute to this “most wonderful time of the year” artists Lauren YS and Makoto Chi have created twenty-eight works (and a mural) for their new “Five Poisons” exhibition. We’ve interviewed the artists about the work. Click image above to read it, or else.
With a mix of dark humor and an impressive skill at creating inviting, yet dangerous worlds, the artist known as Bub has caught our eye. Click above to read our new interview with the artist and his new body of work, before it's too late.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List