Lisa Hoke’s Technicolor Installations Made From Found Objects

by Amelia Taylor-HochbergPosted on

The stretching, effusively colorful installations of Lisa Hoke are at the same time a landscape and a living thing. Sometimes made from cardboard packing materials, or the reeling repetition of a recognizable label, or simply painted cups, her installations span huge walls, creating an arching spectrum of textured color. At a distance, it’s an alien topography, looking like a chunky rainbow sprawl, but closer up, the materials show themselves, and their intricately patterned organization appears engineered by the hive-mind of an obsessive insect colony. Once the individual parts become recognizable, especially as advertisements, the installations click as an interpretation of the politics of reuse, and the willful accumulation of excess garbage in the name of artistic expression.

“We’re lost, but we’re making good time”, (Yogi Berra). March-Aug 2013. 0-60 The experience of Time Through Contemporary Art. Dimensions variable. North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC.

“We’re lost, but we’re making good time”, (Yogi Berra). March-Aug 2013. 0-60 The experience of Time Through Contemporary Art. Dimensions variable. North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC.


“We’re lost, but we’re making good time”, (Yogi Berra). March-Aug 2013. 0-60 The experience of Time Through Contemporary Art. Dimensions variable. North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC.

“We’re lost, but we’re making good time”, (Yogi Berra). March-Aug 2013. 0-60 The experience of Time Through Contemporary Art. Dimensions variable. North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC.


“Come On Down” at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. On view through April 13, 2014. 16′ x 110′ x 2′. Cardboard packaging, cups, glue, and hardware.

Timelapse of “Come on Down,” currently at the Oklahoma Museum of Art


“Come On Down” at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. On view through April 13, 2014. 16′ x 110′ x 2′. Cardboard packaging, cups, glue, and hardware.


“Come On Down” at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. On view through April 13, 2014. 16′ x 110′ x 2′. Cardboard packaging, cups, glue, and hardware.


“the future ain’t what it used to be”(Yogi Berra). October, 2012 – July, 2013. Dimensions variable. Cardboard, colored packaging and glue. McNay Museum, San Antonio, Texas.

“the future ain’t what it used to be”(Yogi Berra). October, 2012 – July, 2013. Dimensions variable. Cardboard, colored packaging and glue. McNay Museum, San Antonio, Texas.

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