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The Geometric Oddities of Nina Rike Springer

Photographer and video artist Nina Rike Springer molds and shapes the human form to produce evocative geometric expressions. Set against a deep, navy background, three figures void of gender identifications take possession of particular shapes, holding these ambiguous objects in their hands to take on different emotions. In the foreground, a yellow-capped individual curves his body in a protective pose around a circle. To his right, a pink-capped person grasps a sharp multi-angular form. His pointed elbow merges into the shape itself to become a fixed prong, while to his left, a figure lightly holds above his orange-covered head, a tilted pink bar with multi-leveled drips. His body assumes the movement of the shape and develops a sense of heaviness that contrasts greatly with the vigor of the pink-headed figure’s elbow. ohne-titel – epiphany (2012) is reminiscent of 1920s Constructivism, but the Vienna-based artist creates enticing nuances with her bright-colored figures that use extreme tonal contrasts and corporeal contours in order to animate abstractions. See more after the jump.

Photographer and video artist Nina Rike Springer molds and shapes the human form to produce evocative geometric expressions. Set against a deep, navy background, three figures void of gender identifications take possession of particular shapes, holding these ambiguous objects in their hands to take on different emotions. In the foreground, a yellow-capped individual curves his body in a protective pose around a circle. To his right, a pink-capped person grasps a sharp multi-angular form. His pointed elbow merges into the shape itself to become a fixed prong, while to his left, a figure lightly holds above his orange-covered head, a tilted pink bar with multi-leveled drips. His body assumes the movement of the shape and develops a sense of heaviness that contrasts greatly with the vigor of the pink-headed figure’s elbow. ohne-titel – epiphany (2012) is reminiscent of 1920s Constructivism, but the Vienna-based artist creates enticing nuances with her bright-colored figures that use extreme tonal contrasts and corporeal contours in order to animate abstractions.

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