Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Beautiful Morphology of Insect and Women by Laurent Seroussi

Photographer Laurent Seroussi has created a body of work entitled Insectes. This example of photographism is very convincing; bringing us a stunning morphology of creepy insects and beautiful women. The model's hands become sinister pinchers, claws, and other appendages as the beetles, scarabs and Phasmids shift in scale making these larger than life creatures even more intimidating to view. Seroussi has a very successful advertising career that encompasses large range of clients from high-fashion to GreenPeace. See more of his visual wizardry after the jump!

Photographer Laurent Seroussi has created a body of work entitled Insectes. This example of photographism is very convincing; bringing us a stunning morphology of creepy insects and beautiful women. The model’s hands become sinister pinchers, claws, and other appendages as the beetles, scarabs and Phasmids shift in scale making these larger than life creatures even more intimidating to view. Seroussi has a very successful advertising career that encompasses large range of clients from high-fashion to GreenPeace.




Meta
Topics
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Something interesting happens when when artists like Alan and Carolynda Macdonald, who have the painting fundamentals mastered, decide to subvert expectations and perplex a viewers expectations conceptually. Click to read the Hi-Fructose exclusive interview.
The concept of the Wunderkammer, aka The Cabinet Of Curiosities has been an artistic inspiration for some time, however a new show opening in November by Ryan Matthew Cohn and Jean Labourdette takes it up a notch with an exceptional show of sculptures and paintings based thematically on the subject. Click to read the new Hi-Fructose exclusive interview.
Former illustrator turned full-time painter Gregory Hergert’s work has been described as “urban Surrealism”. He paints non-traditional themes in a traditional manner, yet allows the medium to shine through the often brutal settings depicted in his work.
Mari Katayama's photography uses her own body as one of her materials. Born with a rare congenital disorder, the artist had her legs amputated as a child, and at times, her sculptural work emulates the features of her body that the condition caused. The resulting work explores identity, anxiety, and other topics.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List