by Andy SmithPosted on

Andy Ristaino is an Emmy-winning artist known for being the lead character designer, writer, and background artist on the TV show Adventure Time. Ristaino’s hand always seem to be at work, whether it’s the show’s elegant, detail-packed title cards on the crowded drawings he scratches onto napkins and placemats. Both highlight the artist’s talent for making every corner of the page work for him.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Toshihiko Mitsuya’s aluminum foil and metal creations range from the mythical to the natural. More recent work reflects nature’s flora and fauna, creating entire gardens and forest habitats in staggering, delicate detail. When paired alongside actual plantlife, the effect is both maintained and amplified.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Amsterdam-based artist Stefan Glerum creates retrofuturistic illustrations, in a distinctively clear yet vibrant style. At times, these worlds appear closer to our own than we would want them to, depicting obsessions with technology and a desperation that recalls the speculative sci-fi of yesterday. This style lends itself to the artist’s commercial work, in which the artist’s work is distinguished in its off-kilter take on a variety of topics.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new show at 111 Minna Gallery, the works of Michael Reedy and Scott Tulay explore concepts under the banner of “Ghosts and Shadows.” The program is a blend of the Michigan-based Reedy’s pieces, blending abstraction and realistic anatomical drawings, and Tulay’s distorted, architectural works.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Superfine! NYC 2017 is the first rendition of the Superfine! art fair to hit New York, bringing nine gallery booths and 30 indie artist positions to the Meatpacking District. The event subverts the typical fair, opting for a hyper-curated environment over stuffy warehouses. Founders Alex Mitow and James Miille say they created Superfine! as a “reaction to the overall trend of the art market, which we felt was becoming a bit exclusive and stale and ultimately not serving the needs of the artists who depend on steady sales and a constant stream of new collectors to sustain themselves.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Elizabeth Alexander uses classically “domestic” materials to explore femininity, domesticity, and class. Some of her largest sculptures come from handcut wallpaper, but the artist also uses porcelain teacups, pictures from coffee table books, and other goods in her creations. The artist says that “obsession, fanaticism, repetition, and process are both my muse and method.”