by Andy SmithPosted on

Neva Hosking to craft biographical drawings on scraps and unexpected surfaces is rooted in a time long before having her formal training, yet that practice has endured. This approach “built an understanding that a broken and fractured viewpoint often presents a more accurate and multi-faceted view of whatever subject needs to be explored,” she says. The result shows a prism that represents a complex, ever-changing humanity.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jos. A Smith’s dreamlike paintings move between elegance and cacophony. His horse-riders, specifically, carry a quality have a surreal, yet granular quality that invites close inspection. Part of the artist’s work his rooted in his practice of “of trance techniques learned from the Nyngmapa sect of Tibetan Buddhism, research psychologists, anthropologists, and shamans with my own dream records to make that membrane between my waking state and my unconscious more permeable.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Ally Burke

Six years after he started what’s now become a trend of coaster shows in his role at La Luz de Jesus Gallery, Matt Kennedy now offers his latest rendition at Gallery 30 South with “The Coaster Show 2018.” The annual event offers more than 1,000 pieces from hundreds of artists. Approaches include acrylics, watercolors, printmaking, pen, oils, sculpture, ink, and much more.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The acrylic paintings of illustrator Sasha Ignatiadou carry a vibrancy and visceral detail. The artist’s work tends to leave viewers on guessing on the origins of his creation, which outside of her acrylic work, moves between watercolor and digital approaches.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Kai Carpenter

After a hiatus, Roq La Rue opens its doors again with “Lush Life 6.” The Seattle gallery re-opens on Oct. 11, continuing a string of group shows under the “Lush Life” banner that have taken place throughout its two-decade history. Owner Kirsten Anderson was busy during the two-year hiatus, founding Creatura House and a conservation/educational group.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new show at Copro Gallery in Santa Monica, Chet Zar revisits the classic baddies of pop culture with the show “Villains.” Just as he does in his art, the artist is able to tether his fascination with the dark and dystopic to art history. “I am interested in the villain archetype as a subject matter,” Zar tells us. “I always have been fascinated by them and I thought it would be fun to do my own take on some. Every great story has a great villain. They are just as important as the heroes. In fact, they create the opportunity for heroes. But more to the point, I just think villains are more interesting and fun to think about. I mean, which part of the Bosch’s ‘Garden of Earthly Delights’ triptych do people talk about? ‘The Garden of Eden’ or ‘The Last Judgement’? I think it’s at the core of what Dark Art is all about- dark imagery is just more fun and interesting to explore.”