by Andy SmithPosted on


Jason Hackenwerth’s enormous, inflatable sculptures emulate organic forms, writhing and towering over passers-by on streets across the globe. His “Animal Soul” series, in particular, features vibrant creatures created from latex balloons. He recently showed this wearable works in an exhibition exhibition at Brookfield Place in New York City. Like much of his work, it was a temporary affair.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Whether on his murals or in his acrylic paintings, Venezuelan artist Koz Dos implements several approaches into each of his portraits, including geometric abstractions, classical realism, and otherworldly distortions. The artist emerged out of the graffiti scene in Caracas, the country’s largest city. His portraits on massive structures carry fine detailing, packed into the ornamental and natural elements of his pieces.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Grip Face’s graphical, object-based art has appeared in museums and galleries and on walls and everyday objects across the globe. The artist works with both familiar and abstract imagery in his pieces, which take notes from comic book art and whatever structure they’re painted on. Much of the work, event in its most unsettling alterations of its human subjects, is teeming with humor.

by Andy SmithPosted on

British illustrator Sam Richwood blends both sparse and lush details into his works. In the “Galaxy Garden” series, the futurescapes and romanticism of his scenes benefit from both approaches. The artist says that he hopes his worlds are able to “suggest a place beyond the canvas.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

At Burlington City Arts, Crystal Wagner‘s first-ever work existing in both the interior and exterior of a space comes with “Traverse.” Wagner is known for biomorphic creations that span sculpture, prints, and installations. This exhibition, running through Oct. 2, features a site-specific installation that “grows from floor to ceiling and emerges outside to meander across the exterior façade.” Wagner was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Philadelphia artist Nathan Reidt crafts scenes in which everyday objects and beings garner growths and mutations. His drawings, in particular, carry a particular eeriness in their starkness, the artist’s abilities with light adding depth to each creation.