by Andy SmithPosted on

Painter Edward del Rosario’s theatrical, yet controlled tableaus carry cross-cultural references. Often in the artist’s work, each of the characters seem to have their own narrative or motivation, creating a piece teeming with both humor and surprising complexity, once absorbed.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Matias Bechtold uses cardboard, plastics, and objects found around a home to erect intricate cityscapes. One of the most dazzling aspects of Bechtold’s work is how he’s able to use packaging materials and even vacuum cleaners to create texturally convincing skylines. In an architectural sense, the artist is also playing with what’s possible within the future of that industry.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Over the past few years, many of Ivy Haledeman’s intimate paintings have focused on an anthropomorphic female hot dog character. The character bends and lounges across the canvas, often extending most of its form out of our view. While surely offering more erotic themes to extract, Haldedeman’s paintings also seem to be offering reflections on the capitalistic system that produces “hot dogs” themselves.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Aspencrow’s hyperrealistic figurative sculptures blend the provocative with pop. Blending materials like resin, fiberglass, and silicone, his works serve as both admiring and wry portraits. The artist was born in Lithuania and moved to England to attend Birmingham City University, School of Art.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using ballpoint pen, Helena Hauss draws scenes that she says are “about self-acceptance through self-deprecation and satire.” The process is laborious for the Paris artist, who has said the choice of pen is deliberate in its stubbornness. The below work, “Afternoon Delight,” took 300 hours to complete.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Michael Craig-Martin’s sculptural practice, he creates enormous versions of everyday objects that appear as though they were drawn. In a show ending this week, he offered new works in this vein at Gagosian’s Britannia Street location in London. This was the first time works in this series were shown indoors.